Paramedic vs Fireman, Which Is Better Career?

Paramedic vs Fireman, Which Career Is Better?

So you’re thinking about a career as a fireman or a paramedic?

Choosing a professional path isn’t always simple!

Choosing the appropriate job requires consideration of your personality, interests, and objectives.

In addition, earning potential, demand for positions, and remuneration must all be considered while picking a vocation.

In this article, we’ll discuss career paths for either Paramedic vs Fireman

So Paramedic vs Fireman, Which Is Career is Better?

Working as a paramedic or a firefighter entails working shifts and being on your feet for long periods. Both job options are extremely rewarding, but helping the community necessitates coping with high-stress circumstances. Both firefighters and paramedics make modest pay, with firefighters earning somewhat more than paramedics.

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The answer to this question can be found in a person’s interests in one or both of the disciplines.

Both fields can lead to a fulfilling career; nevertheless, your ability to adapt to the domain you choose is critical.

Knowledge of the distinctions between the two disciplines, which will give you a better understanding, is arguably the most effective way to find and pursue your passions.

You may then make the best selections for yourself, taking into consideration job opportunities, pay, and, most significantly, your interests.

Let’s look at what it takes to be a Nurse Vs Paramedic now that we’ve addressed the big question.

So let’s talk about Paramedics

As a paramedic, you will work with individuals at their most vulnerable, when they are sick or injured and require assistance. It is a privilege to be in a position where you can and do make a difference in someone’s life because of your knowledge, abilities, and experience.

Nothing compares to the responsibility of physically having someone’s life in your hands, knowing that your decisions and actions might make the difference between life and death. Working as a paramedic may evoke both positive and bad emotions.

It’s a bad moment where there is an unexpected death, especially among youngsters. In contrast, it’s a great moment when you are assisting in the delivery of a new baby, you are overwhelmed with joy.

When you have a companion you like spending time within between calls, there is laughing and happiness

Being a paramedic is a difficult profession that demands physical stamina, composure under pressure, medical knowledge, the ability to make rapid judgments, and compassion to be sympathetic to patients even in difficult situations.

People’s lives are frequently dependent on these providers’ prompt responses and competent care. EMTs and paramedics respond to medical emergencies by providing medical care and transporting patients to hospitals.

To be nationally recognised as a paramedic, you must first be qualified as an EMT, which requires passing a state-approved EMT course and exam as well as CPR-Basic Life Support certification.

With these documents in hand, you can apply to the National Registry for Emergency Medical Technicians for National Paramedic Certification.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (bls.gov), the Employment of EMTs and paramedics is projected to grow 11 per cent from 2020 to 2030, faster than the average for all occupations.

Unfortunately, most paramedics are forced to take a second job or try to earn extra money by working overtime and/or standby shifts because it is very impossible to make a fair living as a paramedic on low pay working only 40 hours per week.

So let’s talk about Firefighters

Many people are drawn to the firefighting career because of the companionship it provides.

Firefighters operate together as a team, with each man or woman in uniform relying on the other to complete a task. When one firefighter is in difficulty, another is dispatched to assist him.

Firefighters typically work 24-hour shifts and spend long hours together at a station. For many, the fire station becomes a second home, with meals cooked and shared as a family. If you love working as part of a team to achieve a shared objective and making possibly lasting connections, this is the place for you.

Firefighters must possess stamina, endurance and strength to perform in an emergency.

If you enjoy physical activities and staying fit, this is another reason to be a firefighter. Most fire stations have workout equipment, and firefighters are encouraged to exercise daily.

It is not simple to become a fireman. It requires a lot of effort, a lot of training, a lot of devotion, and a genuine desire to assist people. The area of firefighting is also quite competitive. Depending on the region, you’ll be up against hundreds, if not thousands, of candidates.

So what education do you typically require you ask?

A high school diploma or similar is generally necessary for entry-level schooling to become a firefighter.

To earn the emergency medical technician (EMT) certification, however, some postsecondary training is typically required, such as in assessing patients’ health, dealing with trauma, and clearing blocked airways. The criteria for EMTs differ by city and state.

High school graduation and training in emergency medical services are generally required for firefighters.

Applicants must pass written and physical exams, as well as interviews and training at a fire school.

Fire departments may also require firemen to obtain other certifications, such as emergency medical technician (EMT).

Firefighting is a risky job that needs bravery, rapid situation assessment, and physical strength.

Even though firefighters often make a good livelihood, the majority of men and women join the fire department because they desire to help others.

What do Firefighters do every day?

Firefighters are responsible for controlling and extinguishing flames as well as responding to crises involving people, property, or the environment.

Firefighters typically do the following:

  • Respond to emergencies
  • Drive fire trucks and other emergency vehicles
  • Put out fires using water hoses, fire extinguishers, and water pumps
  • Find and rescue occupants of burning buildings or other emergencies
  • Treat sick or injured people
  • Prepare written reports about emergency incidents
  • Clean and maintain equipment
  • Conduct and participate in drills related to rescue tactics, equipment use, and treatment of victims in emergency medical situations

What do Paramedics do every day?

In emergency medical situations, emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and paramedics provide care to the sick and injured.

People’s lives are frequently dependent on these providers’ prompt responses and competent care.

Thanks, EMTs and paramedics respond to medical emergencies by providing medical care and transporting patients to hospitals.

While caring for and moving patients, EMTs and paramedics must do a lot of kneeling, bending, and lifting.

They may be exposed to infections and viruses that are communicable, such as hepatitis B and HIV. Belligerent patients can sometimes damage them.

Following correct safety precautions, such as waiting for authorities to clear an area in a violent scenario or wearing gloves when working with a patient, can lessen these hazards.

EMTs and paramedics that are paid well work full-time. Some employees work above 40 hours per week.

EMTs and paramedics may be required to work overnight and on weekends in the event of an emergency.

EMTs and paramedics sometimes work 12- or 24-hour shifts.

Work schedules for volunteer EMTs and paramedics are unpredictable. They may, for example, only work a few days per week.

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Fireman or Paramedic, who earns more? (Explained)

Firefighters earn more than Paramedics, with the median wage of a Firefighter being $52,500 compared to $38,640 for a Paramedic. 

However, wages will vary on the number of years of experience, geographical location, etc.

How much do Paramedics earn?

The median annual wage for EMTs and paramedics was $36,650 in May 2020. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 per cent earned less than $24,650, and the highest 10 per cent earned more than $62,150.

In May 2020, the median annual wages for EMTs and paramedics in the top industries in which they worked were as follows:

Hospitals; state, local, and private $38,640
Local government, excluding education and hospitals $38,580
Ambulance services $34,250

Source: MTs and Paramedics: Occupational Outlook Handbook:: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (bls.gov)

How much do Firefighters earn?

According to BLS.gov, the median annual wage for firefighters was $52,500 in May 2020. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 per cent earned less than $26,940, and the highest 10 per cent earned more than $93,790.

Unfortunately, firefighters, like paramedics, are compelled to work a second job or try to supplement their income by working overtime and/or standby hours since it is impossible to make a decent living as a fireman on low pay.

Final Thoughts

Working as a paramedic or fireman requires you to perform shifts including weekend work. While both occupations are very rewarding, assisting others requires dealing with high-stress situations. Firemen and paramedics both receive modest salaries, with firefighters somewhat more than paramedics.

Choosing a career path is a significant decision.

Before settling on a job or career, examine yourself and learn your skills and limitations, just like you would with any other vocation.

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References

  • Firefighters: Occupational Outlook Handbook:: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (bls.gov)
  • EMTs and Paramedics: Occupational Outlook Handbook:: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (bls.gov)