Human Resources Vs Marketing, Which One Should I Study?

Human Resources Vs Marketing, Which One Should I Study? (Solved & Explained)

I often get emails asking about studying Human Resources and Marketing.

There does seem to be confusion even though they are different streams.

In this article, we’ll help provide some clarity around studying and pursuing a career in either Human Resources or Marketing.

So, Human Resources Vs Marketing, Which One Should I Study?

Human Resources and Marketing both attract a large number of college students because they offer interesting and varied career paths with opportunities for advancement. Although marketing typically pays more than human resources, both professions pay well. 

Human Resources is seen to be better for those wanting to assist development of employees, and to play a part in influencing strategic business decisions. 

Marketing is seen to be a better fit for individuals who like the challenge of explaining to customers why they should pick a certain product or service.

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College Interesting Stuff

So end of the day, the answer to this question lies in a person’s interests in any of the two fields.

Both fields can offer a rewarding career; however, that depends on how well you can adapt to the domain you choose.

Perhaps the best way to identify and find your interests is by knowing the differences between the two fields, giving you a deeper insight.

You can then make the right decisions by keeping job prospects, salaries, and, most importantly, your interests in mind

Human Resources and Marketing have the same educational requirements, costing the same amount of money and taking the same amount of time.

Both of these professions necessitate strong interpersonal skills.

They will require you to be skilled at communication, problem-solving, and relationship building.

That being said, Human Resource professionals do require high levels of emotional intelligence in having to manage people and workplace arrangements

The key distinction is that HR focuses on the internal audience, or employees, whereas Marketing focuses on external stakeholders such as clients, the media, and competitors.

The employment of human resources managers is projected to grow 6 per cent from 2019 to 2029, faster than the average for all occupations.

Employment growth depends largely on the performance and growth of individual companies.

As new companies form and organizations expand their operations, they will need more human resources managers to administer and monitor their programs.

Human resources managers usually need a bachelor’s degree.

Candidates may earn a bachelor’s degree in human resources or another field, such as business management, education, or information technology.

Courses in subjects such as conflict management or psychology may be helpful.

A bachelor’s degree is required for most advertising, promotions, and marketing management positions.

These managers typically have work experience in advertising, marketing, promotions, or sales.

Overall employment of advertising, promotions and marketing managers is projected to grow 6 per cent from 2019 to 2029, faster than the average for all occupations.

The good news is advertising, promotions, and marketing campaigns will continue to be essential for organizations as they seek to maintain and expand their share of the market.

So now we have answered the main question let’s further explore the career paths of HR & Marketing.

Human Resources Vs Marketing, Harder To Study? (Solved & Explained)

Human Resources and Marketing appear to be equally difficult. One is not more difficult than the other. The level of difficulty will be determined by the student’s interests and preferences.

Subjects will vary between institutions, however, you can expect to learn Human resource management covering recruitment, selection, training and development, workplace diversity, employee relations, performance and change management and remuneration.

Develop invaluable counselling, mediation and negotiation skills that will stand you in good stead in any field you enter in the future.

Subjects will vary between institutions, however, you can expect to learn everything from social media, advertising, digital marketing and campaign planning to consumer behaviour, market research, branding, marketing strategy and data analysis.

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What Human Resource Professionals Do Everyday? (Explained)

Human resources managers plan, coordinate, and direct the administrative functions of an organization.

They oversee the recruiting, interviewing, and hiring of new staff; consult with top executives on strategic planning; and serve as a link between an organization’s management and its employees.

Human resources managers typically do the following:

  • Plan and coordinate an organization’s workforce to best use employees’ talents
  • Link an organization’s management with its employees
  • Plan and oversee employee benefit programs
  • Serve as a consultant to advise other managers on human resources issues, such as equal employment opportunity and sexual harassment
  • Coordinate and supervise the work of specialists and support staff
  • Oversee an organization’s recruitment, interview, selection, and hiring processes
  • Handle staffing issues, such as mediating disputes and directing disciplinary procedures

Important Skills

Communication skills. Human resources managers need strong speaking, writing, and listening skills to give presentations and direct their staff.

Decision-making skills. Human resources managers must be able to balance the strengths and weaknesses of different options and decide the best course of action.

Interpersonal skills. Human resources managers regularly interact with people, such as collaborate on teams and must develop working relationships with their colleagues.

Leadership skills. Human resources managers must coordinate work activities and ensure that staff complete the duties and responsibilities of their department.

Organizational skills. Human resources managers must be able to prioritize tasks and manage several projects at once.

What Marketing Professionals Do Everyday? (Explained)

Advertising, promotions, and marketing managers plan programs to generate interest in products or services.

They work with art directorsadvertising sales agents, and financial staff members.

Advertising, promotions, and marketing managers typically do the following:

  • Work with department heads or staff to discuss topics such as budgets and contracts, marketing plans, and the selection of advertising media
  • Plan promotional campaigns such as contests, coupons, or giveaways
  • Plan advertising campaigns, including which media to advertise in, such as radio, television, print, online media, and billboards
  • Negotiate advertising contracts
  • Evaluate the look and feel of websites used in campaigns or layouts, which are sketches or plans for an advertisement
  • Initiate market research studies and analyze their findings to understand customer and market opportunities for businesses
  • Develop pricing strategies for products or services marketed to the target customers
  • Meet with clients to provide marketing or related advice
  • Direct the hiring of advertising, promotions, and marketing staff and oversee their daily activities

Important Skills

Analytical skills. Advertising, promotions and marketing managers must be able to analyze industry trends to determine the most promising strategies for their organization.

Communication skills. Managers must be able to communicate effectively with a broad-based team made up of other managers or staff members during the advertising, promotions, and marketing process. They must also be able to communicate persuasively with the public.

Creativity. Advertising, promotions and marketing managers must be able to generate new and imaginative ideas.

Decisionmaking skills. Managers often must choose between competing advertising and marketing strategies put forward by staff.

Interpersonal skills. Managers must deal with a range of people in different roles, both inside and outside the organization.

Organizational skills. Advertising, promotions, and marketing managers must manage their time and budget efficiently while directing and motivating staff members.

Human Resources Vs Marketing, Who Earns More? (Solved)

Human Resources earn less than Marketing. The median annual wage for Marketing Managers was $142,170 compared to Accountant being $121,220 per annum 

Human Resources

In May 2020, the median annual wages for human resources managers in the top industries in which they worked were as follows:

Professional, scientific, and technical services $138,030
Management of companies and enterprises $133,860
Manufacturing $119,880
Government $105,830
Healthcare and social assistance $101,990

Most human resources managers work full time during regular business hours. Some human resources managers work more than 40 hours per week.

Marketing Manager

The median annual wage for marketing managers was $142,170 in May 2020. The lowest 10 per cent earned less than $74,620, and the highest 10 per cent earned more than $208,000.

In May 2020, the median annual wages for advertising and promotions managers in the top industries in which they worked were as follows:

Advertising, public relations, and related services $150,930
Management of companies and enterprises $126,420
Information $119,090
Wholesale trade $96,380

In May 2020, the median annual wages for marketing managers in the top industries in which they worked were as follows:

Professional, scientific, and technical services $150,840
Finance and insurance $150,280
Management of companies and enterprises $149,480
Manufacturing $143,800
Wholesale trade $134,630

Most advertising, promotions, and marketing managers work full time. Some advertising and promotions managers work more than 40 hours per week.

According to the Bureau of Statistics, the median annual wage for marketing managers was $142,170 in May 2020.

Final Thoughts

Human Resources nor Marketing are seen to better than the other. Human Resources and Marketing both attract a large number of college students because they offer interesting and varied career paths with opportunities for advancement. Although marketing typically pays more than human resources, both professions pay well. 

Human Resources is seen to be preferable for individuals who wish to help employees improve and have a say in key company choices.

While Marketing is seen to be a better fit for people who enjoy explaining to clients why they should choose a certain product or service.

Both Human Resources and Marketing play important roles within an organization.

Although different streams there are similarities.

Marketing communicates the company’s brand to consumers, while HR and marketing collaborate to communicate the company’s brand to employees.

Both Marketing and Human Resources offer interesting, varied, in-demand well-paying careers paths.

Deciding on what to study is an important one.

Speak with trusted friends and family, even consult with a career consultant for advice.

Consider your strengths and weakness, likes and dislikes before deciding on the career path to study.

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References

  • Human Resources Managers: Occupational Outlook Handbook: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (bls.gov)
  • Advertising, Promotions, and Marketing Managers: Occupational Outlook Handbook:: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (bls.gov)